Category Archives: Norway

Can‘t stop the rain … (at Hardanger Fjord)

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The house right on the water‘s edge was beautiful, the scenery was beautiful, the rippling water too … but the rain … But we made the most of it and visited spectacular waterfalls, went on wet Norwegian walks, drove up to the Folgefonna glacier and ate good Norwegian food (fishballs, meatballs and lamb in cabbage). The Norwegians rarely eat out as it is so expensive (they pay their people well) and eat good healthy food. Luckily they also like watching football so we kept ourselves occupied with the first round of the World Cup :-).

To Bergen by train

Said to be one of the most beautiful train rides in the world, we travelled through the most amazing scenery and enjoyed free tea and coffee. I was very amused by the American lady behind us who commented that “the butterscotch houses are not very refreshing”.

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Also posted in Bergen

Norway – back to the roots

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It was wonderful to catch up with and introduce Reiner to my Norwegian family. My paternal Grandmother (Bestemor) studied English in Birmingham and stayed when she met my Grandfather (Bestefar). Her father, Ole Dehli founded the Cooperative movement in Norway at the beginning of the 20th Century and there is even a statue of him in Oslo. So it was great to stay with my second cousins Kari in Lunde, Telemark and then Arvid on the Oslo Fjord. I think the pictures say everything about how beautiful it is. The Norwegians are incredibly open and hospitable and we (my sister Jenny and husband Trev, Reiner and I) were made very welcome. We made sure we said “Takk” for everything like we read in the guide book – the Norwegians even say “Takk for sist” (thank you for the last time) when they meet each other after a while.